Research Statement

 

As a scholar in digital rhetorics and humanities, my research is concerned with exploring the ways technologies mediate writing and writing pedagogy. I subscribe to the notion that writing itself is a technology, and that by understanding it as such, we can come to new realizations about how to best understand and teach towards a literacy for the 21st century. While much of my research focuses on the opportunities for pedagogy afforded by digital tools and communities, I’m also becoming more interested in and attuned to the need for socio-cultural critique of communicative interfaces, new media, and digital writing technologies. Such technologies are not neutral tools. They come with rhetorical, cultural, and ideological assumptions embedded in their structural design. I want to know more about how technologies shape our lives—our writing, thinking, believing, acting—and share that knowledge with others. Such an agenda means exploring the ways technologies, despite good intent, often silence, omit and/or marginalize particular social groups, identities, or cultures.

Along these lines, my vision for future research revolves around the notion of critical praxis in new media and digital communities. I invoke the term praxis to signify a socially meaningful and rhetorically conscious method of active response to and within digital spaces, one that bases such action on careful reflection of the ways in which technologies and (digital) communities mediate social realities and hierarchies. It wasn’t until I had defended my dissertation that I felt like I could really “see” what it was I was doing: attempting to enact and enable writing knowledge as a mode of praxis (in the early chapters) and theorizing a method of digital intervention (through realization of digital cultural politics) as praxis in the later chapters. This kind of work, studying the ideological and epistemological make-up of digital (writing) cultures, fascinates me as an intellectual project. But I think my passion for moving in this direction is bigger than that- it has to do with helping others face the challenge of coming to terms with the ways these technologies and their cultures-of-use influence our lives.

As I move towards this type of research, however, I do not leave behind my interest and attention to digital pedagogy scholarship. Rather, I’m interested in taking an approach where my newer research interests can inform my continuing attention to teaching.

 

Download a Writing Sample:

“Archive 2.0: What Composition Students and Academic Libraries Can Gain from Digital-Collaborative Pedagogies.” Composition Studies 42.1 (2014): 35-53. Print. 

Online Writing Sample: 

“Hacking Hetero/Normative Logics: Queer Feminist Media Praxis in Wikipedia.” With Keon Pettiway. Technoculture 7 (2017). Web.

 

Publications 

Peer-Reviewed Articles & Essays

“Critical Digital Praxis in Wikipedia: The Art+Feminism Edit-a-thon.” With Theresa McDevitt, Daniel Weinstein and Kenneth Sherwood. Hybrid Pedagogy. 1 Nov. 2017.

“Hacking Hetero/Normative Logics: Queer Feminist Media Praxis in Wikipedia.” With Keon Pettiway. Technoculture 7 (2017). 

“Writing Theory for the Multimajor Professional Writing Course.” With Matthew Nunes. Pedagogy 18.1 (2018). Print. Forthcoming.

“Women Writing in Digital Spaces: Engaging #Gamergate and Twine in the Gender Studies-Composition Course.” with Sarah Einstein. Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. Blog Carnival 6: Gaming and Social Justice. 7 May 2015.

 “Archive 2.0: What Composition Students and Academic Libraries Can Gain from Digital-Collaborative Pedagogies.” Composition Studies 42.1 (2014): 35-53. Print.

“Queer the Tech: Genderfucking and Anti-Consumer Activism in Social Media.” Harlot of HeartsSpring, 2014.

“Composing with Wikipedia: A Classroom Study of Online Writing.” Computers and Composition Online. Fall, 2012.

“Integrating Special Collections into the Composition Classroom: A Case Study of Collaborative Digital Curriculum.” with Sara Harrington. Research Library Issues. Spring, 2013.

 

Under Review or Preparation

“Wikipedia’s Gender Gap and Disciplinary Praxis: Representing Women and Minority Scholars in Digital Rhetoric and Writing Fields.” Journal of Multimodal Rhetorics. In preparation.

“Teaching Wikipedia: Cultural Politics, Appalachian Rhetoric, and Writing Pedagogy.” College English. Conditional Acceptance.

 

Edited Textbook

Readings on Writing. 2nd ed. with Albert Rouzie and John Whicker. Van Griner, Spring, 2013.

 

Blogs

“Wikipedia’s Gender Problem and What We’re Doing About It (Part II).” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. April 29, 2015.

“Wikipedia’s Gender Problem and What We’re Doing About It.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. April 8, 2015.

“Indigenous Knowledge and Wikipedia’s Enlightenment Problem.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. February 25, 2015. 

“Revisit Last Night’s Twitter #DRCchat: A Storify Round-up of ‘Education in the Cloud – Perspectives, Challenges, & Strategies for Teaching Online'” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. December 19, 2014.

“DRC Wiki Feature Spotlight: Websites & Journals.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. December 10, 2014.

“Literary Citizenship in Wikipedia, Part 2.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. December 3, 2014.

“WordPress as Learning Management System (LMS).” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. November 25, 2014.

“Literary Citizenship in Wikipedia.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. November 5, 2014.

“Revisit Last Night’s Twitter #DRCchat: A Storify Round-up of ‘Beyond a Single Language/Single Modality approach to Writing.'” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. October 28, 2014.

“An Inside Look at Kairos’ PraxisWiki: A Conversation with Dundee Lackey.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. October 22, 2014.

“A Celebration of Wikis Across the Web.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. October 8, 2014.

“Using Wikipedia’s History Function To Teach Writing Process.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. October 1, 2014.

“Wiki Wednesdays Are Back.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. September 24, 2014.

Games

DRC Wiki Quest. with Brenta Blevins. Digital Rhetoric Collaborative.University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. May 20, 2015.

Brochures

“Theories: Wikipedia and the Production of Knowledge.” with Char Booth, Ryan McGrady, Diana Strassman, Wiki Education Foundation. July 2015.

CFPs

“Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Wiki CFP – Call for Participation.” Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. November 12, 2014.

Show Your Work: Interrogating Research Methodologies for Digital Rhetorics and Humanities.” Kairos PraxisWiki. July, 2015.

Reviews

“Webtext of the Month: ‘Let Me Queer My Throat'” Rev. of “Let Me Queer My Throat: Queer Rhetorics of Negotiation: Marriage Equality and Homonormativity,” by Hillery Glasby. Digital Rhetoric Collaborative. University of Michigan Press/University of Michigan Center for Writing. November 18, 2014.

 

Conference Presentations

 

“Digital Pedagogy and Disciplinary Praxis: Representing Minority Scholars in Wikipedia.” Panel Title: Hacking English:  Lit, Productive Disorientation, and Digital Praxis. Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA). Pittsburgh, PA. April, 2018. Accepted.

“Attitudes and Contexts for Wikipedia-based Writing Assignments.” Panel Title: Writing Wikipedia Across Contexts: Critical Notes on Learning Transfer and Community Engagement. Conference on College Composition and Communication. Kansas City, MO. March 2018. Accepted.  

“Show Your Work: Exploring Digital Methodologies in Humanities Research.” Computers and Writing Conference. Findlay, OH. June 2017.

“Understanding and Teaching Critical Digital Praxis.” Conference on College Composition and Communication. Portland, OR. March 2017.

“Engaging Multiliteracies, Engaging Communities: The Digital Rhetoric Collaborative.” Computers and Writing. Menomonie, WI.  May, 2015.

Making the Local Global: Cultural-Critical Student Projects in Wikipedia.” Panel Title: Risks and Rewards of Teaching Writing on a Global Stage: Wikipedia Collaborations, Under-Representations, and Lingering Doubts. Panelists, Robert Cummings, Matthew Vetter, Frances Di Lauro. Conference on College Composition and Communication. Tampa, FL. March 2015. 

“Student Responses to Cultural Identity Readings in the  Writing About Writing Course.” Panel Title:  Opening Writing About Writing Approaches to Identity. Panelists, Sarah Einstein, Michael Johnson, Albert Rouzie, Yavanna Brownlee. Conference on College Composition and Communication. Indianapolis, IN. March, 2014.

“Wikipedia as Web Ecology.” Panel Title: Authorship, Ecologies, and Infrastructures: 21st Century Applications of Wikis in Rhetoric & Composition. Panelists, Matthew Vetter, Rik Hunter, and Thomas Sura. Conference on College Composition and Communication. Las Vegas, Nevada. March, 2013.

“Special Collections in Wikipedia: A Case Study of a Collaborative Digital Curriculum.” with Sara Harrington. American Library Association of Ohio. Wilmington, Ohio. October, 2012.

“Toward a Digital Sophistic: Pedagogy, Civic Participation, and Web 2.0.” Thomas Watson Conference. Louisville, Kentucky, October, 2012.

“Implementing Curricula: The Wikipedia Writing Assignment.” Panel Title: Moving Beyond Theory: Issues of Praxis in Wiki Instruction. Panelists: Carra Leah Hood, Matthew D. Barton, and Matthew Vetter. Conference on College Composition and Communication. St. Louis, Missouri. March, 2012.

“Composing for Online Audiences in the Writing Classroom: Experiments and Innovations with Wikipedia.” College English Association of Ohio. Athens, Ohio. April, 2011.

“Crisis as Fortune: Exploring Aporias in the Writing Classroom.” Madison Conference on Language and Literature. Madison, Wisconsin. February, 2011.

 

Digital Book Project

 

Title: Interventions in Wikipedia: Teaching TechnoCritical Literacy in the Online Encyclopedia Anyone Can Edit

Genre: Digital Born Single Author Book

My long-term research project is a planned expansion and revision of my dissertation, “Teaching Wikipedia: The Pedagogy and Politics of an Open Access Writing Community.” The book will work off previous research in computers & writing to articulate a conceptual definition for techno-critical literacy centered around the notion of critical digital praxis. Such a framework will introduce the need for a criticality of the ideological and epistemological functions of digital technologies and communities, using the online encyclopedia Wikipedia as both the subject of critical analysis and the site of critical interventions (praxis). This project will attempt to speak to individuals in digital humanities and computers and writing communities through the presentation of multiple case studies of interventions in Wikipedia and the accompanying possibilities for teaching/writing within those case studies.